Advertisements

Add Your Drop in the Ocean

I am a big proponent of teachers walking the talk of writing. If we teach it, shouldn’t we know the struggles our students face as they apply our teaching? Shouldn’t we experience similar struggles so we have ideas on how to help our kids? This seems like such a simple thing, yet so many teachers surprise me when they do not claim the title of writer.

I am a writer. And I have become an evangelist for teachers as writers.

My co-writers here at Three Teachers Talk and I extend the invitation again:  please write with us. We’d love to publish the experiences you’re having with your readers and writers. Share your successes and your struggles. Share a student-made list of their favorite authors or poems or books. Share student work. Share your reflections.

Just share.

teamwork quote

To write a guest post, please complete this simple form. We’ll get back to you ASAP.

 

Advertisements

Tagged: ,

5 thoughts on “Add Your Drop in the Ocean

  1. […] asking of them.  I highly recommend reading Public Teaching, doing some writing (how about with us?), and reflecting on your teaching by doing […]

    Like

  2. […] relaxed into becoming teacher-writers, which is something we all believe every teacher should make a part of her […]

    Like

  3. […] Teachers need to write because it’s pieces us back together.  We need to write, because others need to see our hurts to know they’re not alone.   […]

    Like

  4. ML April 16, 2017 at 5:05 pm Reply

    Can someone write a post on English teachers who can’t motivate their own progeny to read?? I can have success in the classroom but not at home with my teenager. He used to read a lot but now not much grabs him. I hope it’s just a phase. I have pushed it so much in the past that maybe it’s a little act of rebellion. I know he’s reading some at school but no choice reading. Any advice?

    Like

    • Amy Rasmussen April 20, 2017 at 8:54 am Reply

      I wish I had advice ML. My husband and I are huge readers, and our home is filled with books. I took my little kids to the library regularly, read to them often, bought books at book fairs, and more. Of my four sons — two are avid readers of books, one reads news with an addiction, and one thinks he’s above reading (and everything else really). We win some.

      One of the best experiences I had with one of my sons was when we read the same book and talked about it. Simon Sinek’s Start with Why. My son is now a fan of Mr. Sinek’s work, and he wants to explore it more. With another son, I purchased and read books about the military. He is now in the Army.

      That’s the best I’ve got to tell you. Keep talking, encouraging, sharing. That motivation to read has to come from within. Maybe someday your son will get it back. Hope so.

      Like

What are you thinking?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

classroomcommunities.wordpress.com/

Building Relationships, Empowering Learners

Heinemann

Mentors with Insights, Ideas, and Resources for Secondary Readers & Writers Workshop

Literacy & NCTE

The official blog of the National Council of Teachers of English

kelly's blog - Kelly Gallagher

Mentors with Insights, Ideas, and Resources for Secondary Readers & Writers Workshop

Moving Writers

Move the writing. Move the writer.

Blog | The Educator Collaborative Community

Voices of Educators Making a Difference

The Paper Graders

Teachers thinking about teaching, education, technology and anything else that bugs us.

Ethical ELA

conversations on the ethics of teaching English

%d bloggers like this: