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Make Your New Year Revolutionary

It’s the end of New Year’s Day, and I am pondering resolutions. I should have probably already made some, but the end of 2013 took over my heart, and I am a little behind.

My husband’s grandmother passed away two days before my sweet mother. We attended two funerals in one weekend. Since we had to travel and plan services, I took the last seven days of the semester off, which means I missed reviews and final exams and calculating semester grades. I have a lot to do. And I’m having a hard time feeling like doing it.

But I will. And as I’m thinking about my resolutions I know I need to help my students set some, too.

So many need to read more, write more, do more. And I only have one more semester to help them learn.

So I am going to slow down, be more purposeful in my conversations with students, take more time for allowing them to talk, express, emote.

I am going to extend writing time, allow more hours to create and polish and publish–instead of rushing to meet the end of a grading period like I always seem to do.

I am going to keep filling my award-winning-books-only bookshelf and challenge advanced students to take on more advanced texts.

And finally, I am going to use Twitter more in the classroom: share links to student blog posts, reviews on Goodreads, book suggestions, author tags, and more. Try to model the sharing I do with my own PNL. Twitter made a huge difference in my class two years ago, but I haven’t taken the time to get it set up and going well in class this year. I need to change that.( I’m thinking about Instagram, too, but I’m still mulling around how to use it to promote more reading.)

On Monday I got two messages about resolutions from two of my daughters. Jenna said, “church was all about resolutions. They kept just calling them goals, but I always think a resolution should have a stubbornness to stop something or do something. You know, when people say things, resolutely? There’ something with staying power there. So, yeah, I’ve made some resolute goals for the New Year.”

And Kelly said, “I hope you all are making some New Year’s REVOLUTIONS! Not resolutions because that is lame…And revolutions are big. Make it a year to remember with me!

Next Tuesday my students and I will be back in the classroom. We will talk about being more resolute in revolution readour learning, more intentional as we learn together this spring. We’ll set some new goals.

And if I can figure out how to get students to do all this grading (the one thing that bugs me the most about teaching), well, that will be truly revolutionary.

Happy New Year, friends.

What are your New Year’s Revolutions?

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2 thoughts on “Make Your New Year Revolutionary

  1. Erika B. January 2, 2014 at 5:44 pm Reply

    Your daughters have such wonderful, humorous, and important insight! Bringing in the new year with such gumption and practicality is refreshing! Thank you for sharing!

    Like

  2. thehunni January 2, 2014 at 7:02 am Reply

    Reblogged this on thehunni.

    Like

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